34yr-old broken robot. Attempting self-repair. Need money for parts and fuel. 22027 USA.

31st July 2014

Photoset reblogged from with 16,250 notes

owlturdcomix:

Supplies dwindle.

image | fb | twitter

Tagged: bugspidercentipedeinsectOwl Turdowlturdcomix

15th February 2014

Photo reblogged from Tea Cake with 1,102 notes

insectlove:

By Nuwan Chathuranga

insectlove:

By Nuwan Chathuranga

Tagged: Nuwan Chathurangainsectbug

Source: inaturalist.org

9th November 2013

Post

faceandname said: When you feel like you’re ready you could try challenging your self and take them out side. They’re alive exactly like us. The more I don’t smash the better I feel. They protect us from worse. Compassion is strength and understanding. #hallmark

I do usually try to catch bugs and relocate them (outside) when I can.  There are just some that flip out and jump/scuttle around really fast, and there’s almost no way you can capture them with any surety without damaging them.  I don’t especially like killing them, even if they creep me out, if I can help it.  And I know they do prey on insects/etc in a helpful way.  But there are just some where it’s like:  “Our natures our incompatible.  We are too evolutionarily alien to each other.  I wish I could just tell you to stay away.  But you insist on intruding into my personal space for inscrutable buggy purposes that I am too big to understand.  I’m sorry.”  It’s not that I like being a monstrous gigantic killing machine to them.  Some of them just don’t seem to take hints.  That’s kind of a mini bug-sized Darwin Award.

Tagged: personalbugspiderhouse centipede

8th November 2013

Post with 1 note

faceandname said: Harmless to humans.

I know.  But it’s those too-many whispy legs and sudden scuttling movements.  They awaken my mammalian self-preservation instincts (i.e., immoderate bug-smashing rage).

Weirdly, I’m totally okay with millipedes.  I usually see at least one or two tiny ones per day, living in a basement as I do.  But… they’re actually kinda cute, and they don’t have long, whispy legs, or move fast.  And there’s absolutely zero chance a millipede will crawl up onto my bed while I’m asleep, even if the sheets happen to accidentally trail onto the floor invitingly.  I don’t even think one of them could, if it wanted to.

Tagged: personalbugspiderhouse centipedemillipede

8th November 2013

Post with 5 notes

I hate when I’m at home and I see a spider or cave cricket or house centipede or something, and I’m just like, “Can you not”

Tagged: personalbugspiderhouse centipede

12th September 2013

Photoset with 68 notes

This Insect Has The Only Mechanical Gears Ever Found In Nature

The finding, which was published today in Science, is believed to be the first functional gearing system ever discovered in nature. Insects from the Issus genus, which are commonly called “planthoppers,” are found throughout Europe and North Africa. Burrows and Sutton used electron microscopes and high-speed video capture to discover the existence of the gearing and figure out its exact function.

The reason for the gearing, they say, is coordination: To jump, both of the insect’s hind legs must push forward at the exact same time. Because they both swing laterally, if one were extended a fraction of a second earlier than the other, it’d push the insect off course to the right or left, instead of jumping straight forward.

The gearing is an elegant solution. The researchers’ high-speed videos showed that the creatures, who jump at speeds as high as 8.7 miles per hour, cocked their back legs in a jumping position, then pushed forward, with each moving within 30 microseconds (that’s 30 millionths of a second) of the other.

The finely toothed gears in their legs allow this to happen. “In Issus, the skeleton is used to solve a complex problem that the brain and nervous system can’t,” Burrows said in a press statement.

The gears are located at the top of the insects’ hind legs (on segments known as trochantera) and include 10 to 12 tapered teeth, each about 80 micrometers wide (or 80 millionths of a meter). In all the Issus hoppers studied, the same number of teeth were present on each hind leg, and the gears locked together neatly. The teeth even have filleted curves at the base, a design incorporated into human-made mechanical gears because it reduces wear over time.

[via Smithsonian (check out the full article for an animated GIF of the gears in action)]

Tagged: insectbuggearcogmechanical

24th April 2013

Photoset reblogged from loathsome profusion with 3,812 notes

ianbrooks:

Amber Inclusions by Anders Damgaard

With all this discussion recently surrounding the ethics of manipulating DNA in an effort to resurrect lost species, it seems appropriate that we take a look back in time at the vessels for our future T-Rexes and (fingers crossed~!) Giant Ground Sloths. Until that glorious day when we will ride atop the backs of huge beavers (it was a thing! Science up), admire the beauty of these amber-encased insects, forever looking out at us through a layer of several million years.

Photog: Flickr / Website / Blog

Tagged: Anders Damgaardamberinsectbugfossil

Source: ianbrooks

16th March 2013

Photoset reblogged from IanBrooks.me with 645 notes

ianbrooks:

ARThropods by Emilio Garcia

Part of the Tokyoplastic x Emilio Garcia exhibit at Toy Art Gallery, LA. March 2013, bringing Emilio’s freakishly big-brained insectoids to metallic life.

Artist: Flickr / Website / Facebook (photos by notcot)

Tagged: Emilio Garciabuginsect

17th February 2013

Photo reblogged from fallingdowntherabbithole with 2,903 notes

astronomy-to-zoology:

A Trilobite Beetle (Duliticola hoiseni) making its way downtown.
video source

astronomy-to-zoology:

A Trilobite Beetle (Duliticola hoiseni) making its way downtown.

video source

Tagged: trilobite beetlebeetlebuginsect

Source: astronomy-to-zoology

22nd December 2012

Photo reblogged from Cute Bugs with 32 notes


My own photo. :)

My own photo. :)

Tagged: bugsubmission

20th December 2012

Photo reblogged from Ducks Make Everything Better with 297 notes

trilliansthoughts:

Nature never fails to amaze me. A stick insect, known as the Mossy Walking-stick (Trychopeplus laciniatus). 

trilliansthoughts:

Nature never fails to amaze me. A stick insect, known as the Mossy Walking-stick (Trychopeplus laciniatus). 

Tagged: insectbugcamouflage

Source: trilliansthoughts

12th July 2012

Photo reblogged from Juggling Eddie's little slice of groovy geekdom. with 555 notes

somethingsforyoutolookat:

Tessaratomid Shield Bug Nymph (Tessaratomidae) by itchydogimages on Flickr.

somethingsforyoutolookat:

Tessaratomid Shield Bug Nymph (Tessaratomidae) by itchydogimages on Flickr.

Tagged: insectbug

Source: somethingsforyoutolookat

28th April 2012

Photo reblogged from fauna with 1,093 notes

animalworld:

MITCHELL’s DIURNAL or PAINTED TRILOBITE COCKROACHPolyzosteria mitchelli©clusterpod
This is an especially nice shot by Tumblr’s own clusterpod, a wonderful Australian photographer.
Polyzosteria mitchelli belongs to the Blattidae family (one of four cockroach families) along with 218 species in 20 genera (Australian Faunal Directory). The genus Polyzosteria from the same source has 15 species with many also very colourful. However Polyzosteria mitchelli would have to be one of the most striking with its brilliant color combination. It is mainly recorded from the semi-arid areas of WA, SA and NSW, where always a delight to encounter.
I have found it (usually on shrubby vegetation) from coastal heath to inland mallee flora, including saltlakes and granite outcrops, so although not common, it is very widespread. Growing to 5 cm (2”) in length, it is quite stout and not very fast when compared to the troublesome introduced species that commonly invade houses. The local forms have a bronze background colouration, but apparently metallic green shades have been found in SA. Source
Other photos you may enjoy:
Trilobite Beetle
Fulgoid Planthoppers
Trapdoor Spider
clusterpod: Unidentified Blattid cockroach. Hospital Rocks, Western Australia.

animalworld:

MITCHELL’s DIURNAL or PAINTED TRILOBITE COCKROACH
Polyzosteria mitchelli
©clusterpod

This is an especially nice shot by Tumblr’s own clusterpod, a wonderful Australian photographer.

Polyzosteria mitchelli belongs to the Blattidae family (one of four cockroach families) along with 218 species in 20 genera (Australian Faunal Directory). The genus Polyzosteria from the same source has 15 species with many also very colourful. However Polyzosteria mitchelli would have to be one of the most striking with its brilliant color combination. It is mainly recorded from the semi-arid areas of WA, SA and NSW, where always a delight to encounter.

I have found it (usually on shrubby vegetation) from coastal heath to inland mallee flora, including saltlakes and granite outcrops, so although not common, it is very widespread. Growing to 5 cm (2”) in length, it is quite stout and not very fast when compared to the troublesome introduced species that commonly invade houses. The local forms have a bronze background colouration, but apparently metallic green shades have been found in SA. Source

Other photos you may enjoy:

Trilobite Beetle

Fulgoid Planthoppers

Trapdoor Spider

clusterpod: Unidentified Blattid cockroach. Hospital Rocks, Western Australia.

Tagged: bugcockroach

Source: clusterpod

16th April 2012

Photo reblogged from What! with 24,445 notes

pollenies:

A pink Katydid. Usually grey, this is a 1 in 500 mutation. National Preserve, Beverley Shores, Indiana.

pollenies:

A pink Katydid. Usually grey, this is a 1 in 500 mutation. National Preserve, Beverley Shores, Indiana.

Tagged: bugmutantkatydidpinkgenetic mutation

Source: natgeotv.com

8th March 2012

Post with 3 notes

I can hear the frogs calling to each other down in the creek outside.  It seems a little too early in the year for them to be out.  I hope there isn’t a sudden cold snap. We’ll need frogs around to deal with all the extra bugs we’re gonna have this spring and summer, since more of them (and/or their eggs) probably survived the mild winter.

Tagged: frogbuginsect